Tag Archives: doctor

Episode 225: Stephen Moffat Hospital for Abduction

Everybody should know how to get to the hospital for abduction.

This week Kiyan and Dylan make it to the mid season finale, finally! The next half of the season is going to run much slower than this half,  mainly because it’s all one parters, so it’ll take us until Christmas to get through it. But hey, until then we get to enjoy this story, A Good Man Goes to War, written by Stephen Moffat and aired on June 4, 2011.


Show-notes:


1:45 Check out Zenith, our podcast where we watch and discuss Blake’s 7.
2:06 The Roast of Pip and Jane Baker
3:38 Battlestar Galactica and Life on Mars are two shows we don’t have podcasts about.
23:44 People probably fell in to the Thames during the 1814 frost fair. Here’s a better look at a print depicting some fools falling through cracks in the ice.
24:43 This is like the third time I have linked to this River Song timeline thing by Will Brooks and I have become exceedingly efficient at it.
26:00 Born of Man and Woman by Richard Matheson. Ignore the “commentary” on the site and just read the story.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 224: None of that Merriam-Webster Garbage

Verbose – Adj. Using or expressed in more words than are needed.

Kiyan and Dylan are now recording using remote bodies! This is the technology of the future, and we have it right now! Not gonna lie, this is a bit weird. I can’t feel my fingers anymore. Or my legs. Or my head. Its The Rebel Flesh and The Almost People, written by Matthew Graham and aired on May 21 and 28, 2011.


Show-notes:


1:29 Matthew Graham created Life on Mars and sequel Ashes to Ashes. Only the first show has John Simm, but both shows involve a police officer who goes back in time.
10:38 It was probably Ace Lightning.
47:31 Here’s the image of Alice, done by John Tenniel.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 223: The Many Personalities of John Nathan-Turner Ft. Argy

I have more questions than answers right now.

This week we’re joined for our first crossover of the reboot. I think. I’m pretty sure. I’d check but I’m sure enough that  I’m not going to. Just trust me on this one, I’m really certain of it. It’s The Doctor’s Wife, written by Neil Gaiman and aired on May 14, 2011.


Show-notes:


0:33 Argy also joined us on Zenith, our Blake’s 7 podcast.
3:33 One of Neil Gaimain’s first huge success was Sandman. He has also written books like American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Coraline, and Good Omens with Terry Pratchett.
15:14 The Goodies and Space 1999 are British tv shows.
21:01 Red Dwarf is yet another British tv show that people have also recommended to us.
33:08 Neither I nor Dylan could find the Day of the Doctor featurette, but I did find this completely unrelated article from the Winnipeg Sun about a doctor who makes house calls on a motorcycle.
58:41 Michael Pickwoad did all of Peter Capaldi’s Tardis interiors and Matt Smith’s second one.
1:02:53 We reached out to Neil Gaiman on Twitter and he said he didn’t know about Nineveh.
1:10:31 The entire brutal conversation between Pip and Jane Baker and Chris Chibnall.
1:19:02 Contact is a 1997 movie starring Jodie Foster and directed by Robert Zemeckis.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 222: We’re Jersey Shore Pirates, Dude

That’s pretty smartly brah.

Arrrrrr mateys. This week we’re here for a special pirate themed episode of Trust Your Doctor, where we do absolutely none of the following: Neglect to bathe for a month, talk like a pirate in broken english, use strange pirate slang that fell out of use years ago, neglect to shave for years on end. It’s The Curse of the Black Spot, written by Steve Thompson and aired on May 7, 2011.


Show-notes:


1:52 Henry Avery stole from a Mughal fleet in 1695.
5:53 Klaus Badelt
7:50 It might’ve been quicker to look him up in the phone book, but it wouldn’t have been as cool.
8:23 I can’t find the edit anywhere anymore. It was on Youtube for sure. If you can find it, email us.
10:56 According to History Channel, pirates didn’t actually make people walk the plank.
16:24 More about Chinese treasure ships.
16:58 Chinese eunuchs often opposed court scholars and had a lot of political power.
17:47 Mostly Made Up Doctor Who Episode Guide is one of the best Doctor Podcasts out there right now. Go listen to it.
31:24 The Lost city of Z is a 2009 book by David Grann.
33:23 This article explains why Europeans were barely affected by American diseases. Basically, Europe was so disease ridden that they had better immune systems. Syphilis is though to have come to Europe from the Americas though.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 221: Welcome to America

America, heck yea! Censored for unsafe eyes.

This week we finally officially properly start Series 6. Last week kind of counted because it was produced as part of the same thing, but this week is like, the actual thing you know? And! We get to go to America, that’s pretty cool right? It’s The Impossible Astronaut and Day of the Moon, written by Steven Moffat and aired on April 23 and 30, 2011.


Show-notes:


6:10 The 1981 version with really awkward music video.
11:05 Maybe we’ll cover Space 1999 once we finish our Blake’s 7 podcast, Zenith. Maybe.
17:52 Tuesday is a 1991 children’s picture book about werid crap happening on Tuesday.
26:55 Star Trek The Original Series ran from 8 September 1966 to 3 June 1969. Apollo 11 launched on 16 July, so Star Trek was already off the air.
29:51 The Haemovariform from Tooth & Claw was on Earth for a couple hundred years. That’s really the only one I can think of just skimming through the list of stories.
31:56 Here’s the Will Brooks River/Doctor timeline chart again. Gives me a headache just looking at it.
42:12 Here’s Tom Baker playing Rasputin in 1971.
52:14 David Frost’s interviews of Nixon are on Youtube.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 220: You Came to Doctor Who for Consistency?

Ran into The Doctor yesterday. She told me not to expect any consistency in Chibnall’s era either.

Ding dong here come the Christmas bells. The Christmas horses. Reindeer. Ok look Christmas is hard to try shove into this description so I’m just gonna give up. Unlike Kiyan I actually like Christmas though. It’s A Christmas Carol, written by Steven Moffat and aired on December 25, 2010.


Show-notes:


5:02 Skyscraper is a documentary about William Le Baron Jenney, the father of the modern skyscraper.
11:51 Michael Gambon and Richard Harris were the two main actors to play Dumbledore.
16:08 The Calendar (New Style) Act 1750 changed new year’s day from March 25 to January 1 in Britain.
21:16 Christmas Carol came out in 1843, early in the Victorian era.
42:56 Listen to this and tell me it’s not the worst of all Christmas songs.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 219: Rory Danger Pond

Only on Doctor Who would you find someone with the middle name Danger.

This week things go sideways. Like, really sideways. But also it goes upside down and in reverse and crooked. And all those non forward directions that Stephen Moffat loves so much. It’s The Pandorica Opens and The Big Bang, written by Stephen Moffat and aired on June 19 and 26, 2010.


Show-notes:


1:16 The Mill did the effects for this.
13:57 Here’s the paper about the neural network.
27:46 The Borg are a Star Trek villain. Borg is actually a misspelling of “Bored,” cause they’re the most bored race in the universe.
41:28 Aunt Lavinia was Sarah Jane’s biological aunt.
1:07:47 Triple Play is our movie trilogy podcast. We’ve been doing it since 2015 and its age is the same as the number of listeners it has.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 218: James Corden’s Skeleton

Closets hold a lot of skeletons honestly. Or at least, mine do.

James Corden is actually a pretty funny guy. I think because Gordon Ramsey is a chef I confused him with James Corden, somehow, even though their names are literally nothing alike. At all. I must be really dense honestly, because that’s completely bizarre. It’s The Lodger, written by Gareth Roberts and aired on June 12, 2010.


Show-notes:


1:41 The comic version is also called The Lodger.
10:23 Good on the wiki for using a picture that somehow makes Kronos look cool.
32:58 It was The Hopes and Fears of All the Years, which we covered like 9 months ago.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 217: Anything is Better than Traveling with Adric

E-space kind of sucked tho so I’ll give him a pass for trying to escape.

I looked up how to paint once. But it was really difficult and kind of expensive and so I decided it would be better to look up how to digitally paint since I already had photoshop. But then I found out that it’s easier with one of those art tablets so I gave up on that too and started a podcast. It’s Vincent and the Doctor, written by Richard Curtis and aired on June 5, 2010.


Show-notes:


9:48 Vincent and Theo is a 1990 movie. Wonder who ok-ed that poster.
15:10 Apparently it is pronounced “Nye.”
18:43 The Musée d’Orsay is indeed in Paris.
21:55 The “Van Gogh only sold 1 painting in his lifetime” thing has been called into question. Some people say he sold more. Some say he only sold the one – The Red Vineyard. There are plenty of theories out there, and we’ll probably never know how many he really sold for sure.
32:42 Fun fact we had the bipolar to manic depressive in reverse, it used to be called manic depressive and now it’s called bipolar. Basically, “manic depressive” has bigger negative connotations than “bipolar,” so the DSM officially changed the name in the 80s. Also, DSM stands for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.
48:22 Can’t believe I actually found the blog post again.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 216: The Most Productive 12 Minutes in Human History

Da da da da, da da da…. That was supposed to be the A-Team.

Hey look we’re bringing back the Silurians. You all know the Silurians right? They appeared a whole two times! Which is actually less than Sabalom Glitz. And when you really think about that, you have to ask yourself, why are we bringing them back? It’s Hungry Earth & Cold Blood, written by Chris Chibnall and aired on May 22 and 29, 2010.


Show-notes:


4:42 The Kola Superdeep Borehole is over 7 miles deep but only 9 inches across.
12:42 I would hate to be a Predator if it means seeing like this.
17:44 Apparently blue grass music is named after the Blue Grass Boys, a band from Kentucky.
34:24 Malcolm Hulke did create the Silurians.
1:05:53 Check out our new episode on An Unearthly Child.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

Subscribe on Apple Podcasts!
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