Tag Archives: Martha Jones

The Tenth Doctor Retrospective

Only the best parenting tips on this podcast.

This week Kiyan and Dylan take a long introspective look at themselves as parents of a little baby podcast. Have we done it right? Have wee been raising this little boy right? Or girl, whatever it chooses. We also sort of talk about like, The Tenth Doctor and Death and the Queen, written by James Goss and released in May of 2016. Death and the Queen can be purchased for $3 (or your local equivalent) on Big Finish’s website.


Show-notes:


12:29 The Tench Doctor Chronicles were released earlier this year by Big Finish, though not all of them feature Rose.
26:03
Picard and his cloud.
37:09 Before Smith, Davison was the youngest Doctor at time of casting at 29. Tennant was second youngest at 34.
41:06 The Ship of Theseus is a philosophical concept that’s basically what we describe. Check this out if you want to know more.
42:14 Here’s the trailer. Doesn’t really spoil anything or give away too much, even if you haven’t watched up to that point like me. Also, just found out that France won. I don’t follow sports at all.
44:03 Faust is a character from German legend who hangs out with demons. The Marvel character Mephisto is named after a demon from the story.
44:31 The Ferengi don’t hang out with demons, but they look kinda like demons.
54:51 The most interesting part of the Ballad of Russel and Julie was seeing how well the cast can sing.
56:28 And the best part about the cast & crew 500 miles video was probably the dancing Ood.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 209: Let Her Go Russell T.

Don’t you even think about it Stephen.

So it comes to this. The end of the Tenth Doctor, goes out with quite a bang, and about 10 minutes of plot stretched out over two hours with a twenty minute epilogue! Truly, the epitome of the Russell T. Story. It’s The End of Time, written by Russell T. Davies and aired on December 25, 2009 and January 1, 2010.


Show-notes:


4:49 It’s called rack focus.
9:55 More brain stuff from a brain blog that hasn’t been updated in 6 months.
13:07 Children of the Stones. Weird that we’d bring up this series that features a time loop in this episode cause we talk about whether time (and stories) are circular later on.
13:10 Follow Ernest Malley.
1:09:07 According to the wiki he’s only done Song for Ten and the extended version of Song for Ten.
1:13:59 John Barrowman plays Dark Archer on Arrow.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 194: Some Semblance of a Budget

And to think we’ve come far since the days of styrofoam avalanches … but not that far.

This is the longest episode we’ve put out in a long time. It’s over an hour and a half long, and somehow it’s actually sort of interesting for the entire episode, which is really saying something. Remember our War Games episode? Good times. It’s Utopia, The Sound of Drums, and Last of the Time Lords, written by Russell T. Davies and aired on June 16, 23 and 30th, 2007.


Show-notes:


11:58 Stop Crying Your Heart Out is really one of Oasis’ worst songs.
27:26 Yeah, Derek Jacobi has a pretty extensive career.
29:03 As does John Simm.
50:35 Rose gets a TARDIS key in Aliens of London.
1:03:13 Here’s the scene from Watchmen. And here’s the equally-bad one from Ironman.
1:06:01 Tom Ellis is Lucifer. Lucifer is Tom Ellis.
1:09:48 Rolanda Hooch is played by Zoe Wanamaker, who plays Cassandra in series 1 and 2.
1:13:26 Plo Koon. He’s Plo Koon.
1:18:26 The mirror universe from Star Trek sounds pretty “cool” I guess.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 193: Sad is Happy

Everyone gets it wrong, look happy is sad, sad is happy, that’s how it works now.

What’s the equivalent of blinking for your ears? Folding them over? Something like that. Well don’t do that, if you do that while you’re listening to this episode you’ll die. So don’t do that. It’s Blink, written by Stephen Moffat and aired on June 9, 2007.


Show-notes:


1:08 It was Russel T.
1:40 Check out our Ninth Doctor Retrospective. It’s basically a shorter version of Blink, with Sally Sparrow being a little girl who needs to write a report. Also no Weeping Angels.
13:34 Turns out Mark StrickSON has had a long and varied career.
38:30 Even the poster is mediocre.
40:56 Check out this extremely detailed and informative documentary about the making of the Weeping Angels. I can personally say that I’m now enlightened having watched this.
55:15 The Doctor Who Youtube channel has the full Curse of Fatal Death special. Check it out. I triple dog dare you.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 192: Doctor Who Baked Beans

Let’s just file that under “never again.”

This week we disguise ourselves as humans. You do remember we’re not actually humans right? We’re renegade podcast lords, we established that way back when we started the podcast. It’s Human Nature and The Family of Blood, written by Paul Cornell and aired on May 26th and June 2nd, 2007.


Show-notes:


5:15 Atlantis is the greatest Disney movie ever made.
9:15 Where the Red Fern Grows is a book about a kid and two dogs. Spoiler, the dogs obviously die at the end.
9:15 Bridge to Terebithia is another kids book. There were a couple movie versions, but the most recent one was in 2007.
12:23 Maze Runner is yet another kids’ book. Sounds terrible, and the movie is probably worse, but what do I know?
36:19 Just why.
46:03 Split is a movie that came out a couple years ago. Apparently it’s a sequel to a movie that came out in 2000.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 191: Kill the Sun

Perhaps we need to rethink our goals for this podcast…

This week we remind everyone that Nokia totally collapsed. That’s right, that really big phone manufacturer totally ruined themselves. It was no one’s fault but their own. It’s 42, written by Chris Chibnall and aired on May 19, 2007.


Show-notes:


0:28 This year’s Eurovision is only a few months away.
1:30 24 ran for more than 200 episodes over like 9 seasons. Jesus.
3:32 Yeah, they do make smartphones. Look at that 3310.
5:12 You can still check out the prologue story thing.
18:09 John Carpenter used his “phone a friend” on Who Wants to be a Millionaire to tell his dad he knew the answer.
22:45 Check out our Blake’s 7 podcast Zenith.
31:54 RIP.
35:20 Challenger was the one that blew up when it launched. That was in 1986. Columbia was the one that disintegrated during reentry in 2003.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 190: Wet Bone Cracking

Only on Doctor Who will you hear “wet” bone cracking. Ew.

You might say that the man who wrote this story is a greenhorn. You know, like a guy who is new or inexperienced at the task at hand. No? Never mind. It’s The Lazarus Experiment, written by Stephen Greenhorn, and aired on May 5, 2007.


Show-notes:


11:34 Obviously they’re called nibblies.
7:52 The BBC actually only runs ads now. No more content.
9:52 Series 11 is actually 50 minutes, not 60.
16:30 Mark Gatiss plays Sherlock’s brother Minecraft.
14:47 The League of Gentlemen. The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a comic.
20:49 Hypersonic is a speed.
28:27 Yeah, they’re still together.
32:26 Think you combined The Mummy Returns and The Scorpion King there.
44:17 Season 18, not 17.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 189: Hovering Over Hooverville

So many hoovers, so little time.

And now, Martha Jones in her first two parter. Featuring the Daleks, because bloody hell do the Daleks ever not appear? Can you imagine if they named an episode “Mystery of the Daleks” and then didn’t have the Daleks appear at all? The mystery is, where are they? It’s Daleks in Manhattan and Evolution of the Daleks, written by Helen Raynor and aired on April 21 and 28, 2007.


Show-notes:


14:47 More about the building of the Empire State Building here.
18:36 They should start using man o’ wars in actual wars.
19:18 They should bring these back to actual warfare too.
25:09 This was all I could find about the “Daleks have to appear every season” rumor.
39:51 Our movie trilogy podcast Triple Play has conditioned me to think of Star Wars whenever anyone says “Do it”


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 188: Being Angry Isn’t That Fun

Forget being angry, I’m all about being sad now.

Gridlock is unfairly maligned. I’m putting that opinion here in writing, so you can never argue that I’ve said it, even if the audio for this episode gets garbled and never released. Or corrupted by the forces that be (looking at you Russell T.) It’s Gridlock, written by Russell T. Davies and aired on April 14, 2007.


Show-notes:


17:51 Couldn’t have been Christmas Invasion since Janis Joplin died in 1970.
18:22 STEED
21:02 I guess Old Rugged Cross is a southern song because this and all other versions of it that I could find sound pretty southern.
21:06 Stand by m- I mean Abide with Me.
27:06 Last of the Gadarene is a Third Doctor book by Mark Gatiss. If you’re watched or read anything else by Mark Gatiss, then you already know the story of this book. We’re onto you Mark.
37:18 Check out our Blake’s 7 podcast Zenith.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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Episode 187: The History of Inn-keeping

Inn-keeping is a very old and difficult profession.

This week Trust Your Doctor gets super spooky… in February. Why not, I guess, why not just release scary things in February? Nothing says you have to release them in October. It’s The Shakespeare Code, written by Gareth Roberts, and aired on April 7, 2007.


Show-notes:


0:38 Gareth Roberts didn’t write anything for series 1. The only things by him that we’ve covered are Bang-Bang-a-Boom, The Romance of Crime, The English Way of Death, and now this.
2:51 Yeah, Lilith is a demon or something.
20:49 The last time California carried out the death penalty was in 2006.
26:27 This Animaniacs reboot is the most necessary thing in years. Totally 100% needed and I’m sure it will be amazing and won’t even come close to sucking.
27:40 Yeah, it was Arthur C. Clarke.
41:54 This one.
43:16 This trailer for the 1993 Much Ado About Nothing movie kind of feels like it was a VHS preview rather than a theatrical trailer.


Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Murray Gold.

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