Tag Archives: time travel

Episode 151: Bow Ties or No Ties

I’ll take cable ties thanks.

This week we return to your regularly scheduled programming. Which means Pip and Jane Baker are back writing for the show, stumbling through the darkness because no one knows how the hell to characterize the 7th Doctor yet. Thanks Eric Saward/JNT/Andrew Cartmel/Whoever you want to blame for this. It’s Time and the Rani, aired in September of 1987.


Show-notes:


5:36 Crispin Glover, who usually goes by his alter-ego “Really Distinctive Facial Structure Man,” sued some people over some stuff.
25:16 The “intense” sound effects at the end of this.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Keff McCulloch.

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The Sixth Doctor Retrospective

It feels like we just started this era yesterday.

The end of an era, truly. The Sixth Doctor was here for nearly 10 seasons. Wait, you’re telling me that in this universe he only had two seasons? How did you guys cope? So you didn’t get The March of the Valeyard?  Devastation of the Daleks?  The Damnation? I can’t believe it, this really is the darkest timeline. Well, here’s the Sixth Doctor retrospective anyway, featuring an additional discussion of Spiral Scratch. Spiral Scratch was written by Gary Russell and released on the 4th of August, 2005.


Show-notes:


17:20 “Other voice actors: Colin Baker”
21:08 Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency is a book by Douglas Adams. It’s kind of inspired by the Doctor Who serials he wrote, but I thought it was boring and also terrible.
31:08 It’s The Langoliers, which is from a larger collection by Stephen King.
48:24 Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo. Bamboo.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Dominic Glynn.

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Episode 126: Throw a Spleen into a Circuit Board

What the hell is a spleen anyway?

One season closer to the end of classic who. Only 7 more to go! Can you believe that we finished 19 seasons? It actually feels pretty weird. Maybe we can take a time trip back to season 1 and start again… It’s Time-Flight, written by Peter Grimwade and aired in March of 1982.

We’d like to actually, honestly, dedicate this episode to Anton Yelchin.


Show-notes:


5:31 This thing. Everywhere in all of space and time open to you and you want to go here.
8:12 Unless he’s an air traffic controller. Or a TV remote controller. Or a remote controlled car.
10:26 Yeah. There was Scorby from Seeds of Doom. He was kind of a jerk. Go jump in a lake Scorby. Oh wait…
10:52 Well I wouldn’t go that far.
12:58 Roger roger.
18:15 Bioelectronics is a real thing now, but it wasn’t when this episode came out.
18:53 Vestigial organs. The term “vestigial” comes from a corruption of the word “vegetable,” because if you replaced one of these organs with an eggplant or a cabbage you’d never know the difference.
46:17 We said they wouldn’t get a new companion and then 1 second later we were like “yeah, I don’t know.”
47:53 The Wright Flyer was a plane invented by the Wright Brothers after numerous failures with their previous plane, the Wrong Flyer. You don’t want to know about that one.
48:18 Watch and be amazed.
52:52 *cough* …*COUGH COUGH*… *HACK HHHAACCCKGAHAH KAHJSHGJDJDJDJ*… Sorry, just something in my throat.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Peter Howell.

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Episode 94: Equal Opportunity Life Force Drainer

Weng-Chiang is in violation of the temporal employment act.

This week Kiyan and Dylan investigate a mysterious magician in the back alleys of London as they discuss Robert Holmes’ finale to season 14, The Talons of Weng-Chiang. It originally aired in February through April of 1977.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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Episode 1: Skateboard Rampage

I suppose it’s a hoverboard rampage in the future, right?

For the very first actual episode of Triple Play, Kiyan and Dylan did their second one day marathon of Back to the Future! Back to the Future is one of Dylan’s favorite movies, so it’s a good thing they started with it… It also happens to have it’s 30th anniversary this year! Today, July 3rd, happens to be exactly 30 years to the day that the first film premiered.

This was our first episode in this slightly more freeform style, and as such there are some minor errors committed throughout the episode. Below are some corrections, as well as some further information for anyone who is curious enough to want to know more about the Back to the Future trilogy.

Information on the genesis of Back to the Future and the origin of the movie can be found on the Making of Back to the Future Part 1 Documentary that is part of the DVD extras for the 25th anniversary edition of the film.

Here is some information on the earlier drafts of Back to the Future. The fourth revision of the script, which features a more brooding Marty and a different opening scene (which Dylan mistakenly identifies as the refrigerator script) can be read online over here.

A list of Alan Silvestri’s scores, including notes on all of his 15 collaborations with Robert Zemeckis can be found at wikipedia. It’s also worth it to note that while Zemeckis did ask for the more bombastic score, it was Spielberg who disliked the Romancing the Stone score, and not Zemeckis.

A discussion on the casting of Eric Stoltz, and some brief footage of him as Marty can be found, once again, in the DVD extras from the 25th anniversary edition of the film. However, the New York Times has the short clip from the making of documentary hosted on their website.

Kiyan was correct, Christopher Lloyd was an actor in Star Trek III, on the recommendation of Leonard Nimoy. On the other hand, Skinhead turns out not to be the one who wears 3-d glasses.

Thomas F. Wilson did, in fact, play the 2015 version of Biff Tannen, according to IMDB.

Quite a bit of our information on the creation of the second and third films can be seen and expanded upon in Empire’s oral history of the franchise, which can be found over here.

For clarification the original theme is the one that is one of the most recognizable movie themes, not the westernized one in the third film. To hear the “westernized” version of the theme tune used in the third movie, you can click over to a youtube video over here. For comparison here is a link to the pretty recognizable regular version of the theme.

Very recently, Robert Zemeckis has stated that there will only be a reboot of Back to the Future… over his dead body. Thank goodness for that.

For anyone with a love of point and clicks, or TellTale games, or just Back to the Future in general, you can find the Back to the Future video game at TellTale’s official website here.

The Back to the Future musical was announced back in 2014, (you can read a press release here on the BBC website) and was (and probably still is) planned to premiere on London’s West End this year, for the 30th anniversary of the film.

For an extension of what we’ve discussed in this podcast, and an obviously far more in-depth look at the making of Back to the Future , be sure to check out We Don’t Need Roads: The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy, which you can purchase on Amazon. Neither Kiyan nor Dylan have read it, but it’s definitely probably on one of their “to-read” lists.

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Episode 74: That’s Making Life Take the Lemons Back

And then it’s making life not exist anymore!

This week Kiyan and Dylan dive into Malcolm Hulke’s final serial, Invasion of the Dinosaurs. To their pleasant surprise, this weeks serial featured quite a fair bit of character development for the UNIT crew, with Benton, Yates, and The Brig all getting some time in the spotlight. Invasion of the Dinosaurs was aired in January and February of 1974.

By the way, the reference no one would get was to Shrek the Musical. You’re welcome.

Here’s a link to the first volume of that ebook by Hugh Pearson: The Lost Lords of Time: Recons Volume One

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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Episode 73: The Most Low Octane Fight

Still better than a low heptane fight.

This week Kiyan and Dylan check in a new person to the Companion Hotel: Sarah Jane Smith. She’s booked a long stay, let’s see how it goes. The topic of discussion of this week was The Time Warrior, which was written by Robert Holmes and aired in December of 1973 and January of 1974.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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Episode 67: Matador for the Minotaur

Interesting that dor and taur sound similar but are spelled differently.

This week Kiyan and Dylan work towards a new more witty episode…. No totally kidding, they just watched a witty serial. Said witty serial happened to be The Time Monster, written by Robert Sloman (with uncredited additions by Barry Letts), which aired in May and June of 1972.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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Episode 63: Dropping Some Dope Morality

Dope: adjective, informal: very good.

This week Kiyan and Dylan explain the triumphant return and subsequent loss of the Daleks. They tried to exterminate any tangents before they got too big, but some of them were too powerful. Day of the Daleks aired in January of 1972 and was written by Louis Marks.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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Episode 37: The Doctor Dalek

A Doctor/Dalek hybrid? Inconceivable!

This week Kiyan and Dylan wrap up season 4 with The Evil of the Daleks, written by David Whitaker and aired in May and July of 1967. It was the final appearance of the Daleks in Doctor Who for 5 years.

Doctor Who © The BBC
Any other references belong to their respective owners, no copyright infringement is intended by this podcast.
The Doctor Who title music was originally composed by Ron Grainer. The version used in this episode was arranged by Delia Derbyshire.

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