Episode 2: I Wanted Dinosaur Action

Dun dun, dun dun, dun dun dun, dun dun dun dun.

On this episode of Triple Play, Kiyan and Dylan explore another movie juggernaut. Last time it was Back to the Future,  this time it’s Jurassic Park. These movies, however, seem to dip in quality far quicker than Back to the Future did. Listen in and take  journey behind the scenes and explore the Jurassic Park trilogy (excluding Jurassic World, of course). Remember, we spared no expense!

A large portion of our information can be found in the DVD extra documentary The Making of Jurassic Park, which can be found on youtube if you have 48 minutes to spare in addition to this hour long podcast.

For information on the special effects and the creation of the dinosaurs, you can read this fascinating article from Empire Magazine’s August 1993 issue.

io9 put together a compilation of behind the scenes videos about the dinosaur puppets in about 2012, which you can find over here.

We briefly touched upon how the film approached the topic of scientifically accurate vs. fictionally exciting dinosaurs. A comprehensive list of scientific inaccuracies can be found at this dinosaur related website here. 

The Lost World: Jurassic Park, besides having a ridiculous name to type out every time, also had an interesting production history which we touched on a bit. A more in-depth look at the creation of the second film can be found here.

Michael Crichton’s website features tidbits of information on the second film, including comments from Michael Crichton himself before he passed in 2008.

Most  of our information on the third film can be seen in this review from Variety that appeared on their website in July of 2001.

The banner for this episode does not use the theatrical release poster for Jurassic Park, as the Back to the Future banner did. This is largely because it features a black background, which is really rather annoying when you need the poster to form a distinctive triangle. This alternate unused poster, created by famed movie poster artist John Alvin (who did the Indiana Jones and E.T. movie posters), was used instead.

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